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rhamphotheca:

Marbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum)
- Orange County, NC, USA
A. opacum seems to be the most common of the mole salamanders in my area. I find them sometimes in the fall, on roads, or under logs. They breed in fall (and winter?) in my area. This one was under a log along a woodland trail. It was captured and posed for a photo session, then released. I measured the length in another photo adjacent to a scale—about 11 cm, with about 4 cm of that being the tail.
(photos: Patrick Coin)
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rhamphotheca:

Marbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum)
- Orange County, NC, USA
A. opacum seems to be the most common of the mole salamanders in my area. I find them sometimes in the fall, on roads, or under logs. They breed in fall (and winter?) in my area. This one was under a log along a woodland trail. It was captured and posed for a photo session, then released. I measured the length in another photo adjacent to a scale—about 11 cm, with about 4 cm of that being the tail.
(photos: Patrick Coin)
Zoom Info

rhamphotheca:

Marbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum)

- Orange County, NC, USA

A. opacum seems to be the most common of the mole salamanders in my area. I find them sometimes in the fall, on roads, or under logs. They breed in fall (and winter?) in my area. This one was under a log along a woodland trail. It was captured and posed for a photo session, then released. I measured the length in another photo adjacent to a scale—about 11 cm, with about 4 cm of that being the tail.

(photos: Patrick Coin)

rhamphotheca:

Survey Techniques for Giant Salamanders and Other Aquatic Caudata

by ROBERT K. BROWNE, HONG LI, et al.

The order Caudata (salamanders and newts) comprise ~13% of the ~6,800 described amphibian species. Amphibians are the most threatened (~30% of species) of all vertebrates, and the Caudata are the most threatened (~45% of species) amphibian order.

The fully aquatic Caudata family, the Cryptobranchidae (suborder Cryptobranchoidea), includes the the world’s largest amphibians, the threatened giant salamanders. Cryptobranchids present particular survey challenges because of their large demographic variation in body size (from three cm larvae to 1.5 m adults) and the wide variation in their habitats and microhabitats.

Consequently, a number of survey techniques (in combination) may be required to reveal their population and demography, habitat requirements, reproduction, environmental threats, and genetic subpopulations. Survey techniques are constrained by logistical considerations including habitat accessibility, seasonal influences, available funds, personnel, and equipment. Particularly with threatened species, survey techniques must minimize environmental disturbance and possible negative effects on the health of targeted populations and individuals. We review and compare the types and application of survey techniques for Cryptobranchids and other aquatic Caudata from a conservation and animal welfare perspective…

(read more: Amphibian and Reptile Conservation)

http://www.redlist-arc.org/Current-issues/

rhamphotheca:

Gerobatrachus

… also referred to as a frogamander, is an extinct genus of amphibamid temnospondyl that lived in the Permian period, approximately 290 million years ago, in the area that is now Baylor County, Texas. The animal has been interpreted as a concrete example for the hypothesis offered by many cladistic analyses that frogs and salamanders had a common ancestor, and that they are only distantly related to the third extant order of amphibians, the caecilians. Gerobatrachus has been considered to be the closest relative of Batrachia, the clade that includes modern amphibians.

Gerobatrachus combines features found later in frogs, such as a large space for a tympanic ear— an “ear drum“— and two ankle bones that are fused together, a typical salamander trait. Its backbone and teeth show features common to both frogs and salamanders, with a wide, lightly built skull similar to that of a frog…

(read more: Wikipedia)            (image: Nobu Tamura)

rhamphotheca:

Kaiser’s Spotted Newt (Neurergus kaiseri)
- CRITICALLY ENDANGERED 
… also known as the Luristan Newt or Emperor Spotted Newt (not to be confused with Tylototriton shanjing), is a species of very colourful salamander in the Salamandridae family. It is endemic to the southern Zagros Mountains in Iran.
It is primarily found in highland streams that are surrounded by arid scrubland, but can also be found in ponds and pools. Water is absent from its habitat for a significant part of the year, during which this species is known to estivate. It is considered critically endangered due to its tiny range (it inhabits an area of less than 10 km²), continuing habitat loss, and the illegal capture of salamanders for the wild animal trade. It has been estimated that the entire wild population numbers fewer than 1,000 adults.
The Luristan Newt is a candidate for CITES listing. There is also a breeding program for the Luristan Newt at the Sedgwick County Zoo. Iran is planning on starting its own breeding program.
(via: Wikipedia)          (photo: Dr. Richard Bartlett)
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Camera
Canon EOS 20D
ISO
200
Aperture
f/20
Exposure
1/50th
Focal Length
100mm

rhamphotheca:

Kaiser’s Spotted Newt (Neurergus kaiseri)

- CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

… also known as the Luristan Newt or Emperor Spotted Newt (not to be confused with Tylototriton shanjing), is a species of very colourful salamander in the Salamandridae family. It is endemic to the southern Zagros Mountains in Iran.

It is primarily found in highland streams that are surrounded by arid scrubland, but can also be found in ponds and pools. Water is absent from its habitat for a significant part of the year, during which this species is known to estivate. It is considered critically endangered due to its tiny range (it inhabits an area of less than 10 km²), continuing habitat loss, and the illegal capture of salamanders for the wild animal trade. It has been estimated that the entire wild population numbers fewer than 1,000 adults.

The Luristan Newt is a candidate for CITES listing. There is also a breeding program for the Luristan Newt at the Sedgwick County Zoo. Iran is planning on starting its own breeding program.

(via: Wikipedia)          (photo: Dr. Richard Bartlett)

earth-song:

Chinese Giant Salamander

All too often, endangered animals are glamorized. I’ve ranted about how the less-impressive endangered species get so little press before. Sometimes, however, this favoritism is wholly unjustified… Size is not the only thing unique about this river monster. Chinese giant salamanders are also among the few salamanders that make noise. They can whine, hiss, and bark; they may even sound like human babies to some Chinese people. They also have special sensory nodes that run from head to tail in compensation for awful eyesight. Neat.  

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* although i believe that last picture is Dr. Brady Barr holding a Japanese Giant Salamander (Andrias japonicus), and not a Chinese (A. davidianus)

rhamphotheca:

Southern Dwarf Siren (Pseudobranchus axanthus), adult, northern FL, USA.
Sirens are aquatic salamanders, with reduced front limbs and no hind limbs, that retains external gills into adulthood. This species has a max length of 25 cm. Found in the SE United States. They feed on a variety of small aquatic invertebrates.
(photo: Todd W. Pierson)
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XSi
ISO
200
Exposure
1/100th
Focal Length
100mm

rhamphotheca:

Southern Dwarf Siren (Pseudobranchus axanthus), adult, northern FL, USA.

Sirens are aquatic salamanders, with reduced front limbs and no hind limbs, that retains external gills into adulthood. This species has a max length of 25 cm. Found in the SE United States. They feed on a variety of small aquatic invertebrates.

(photo: Todd W. Pierson)

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